AKG

AKG C314

Studio Condenser with 4 Polar Patterns

Order Code: C314
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Our Price: $1,299.00

Made in Vienna

AKG C314 fills a little gap that we didn't even know existed - between the venerable C414XLS multipattern studio legend, and the C214 single diaphragm cardioid condenser.

For those who have recorded with nice microphones, C414XLS needs no introduction, so it's easy enough to go straight to the bullet points for the all-new C314:

4 polar patterns - Cardioid, Supercardioid, Omnidirectional and Figure 8.

There is a switch for 'flat' or 100 Hz 'roll off'
Intelligent pad?
A nice new feature is the 'intelligent pad' found on the side of C314. You can leave it in the 0dB position (135dB Max SPL), and check out the LED just below the switch. If it's glowing green, you're in business. Should it change to RED, your input is clipping the microphone, so flick the -20dB pad into position.

Of course, C314 has years of AKG sound built in. The computer-matched dual diaphragms are based closely on the sound of C414XLS. A very versitile microphone, indeed.

For a great little (6 min) demo video featuring C314 on drum overheads, D12VR on kick and C451B on snare and ride cymbal, check out the video tab below.

Photo of AKG C314 available from Factory Sound
  • C314
  • C314-polarpatterns
  • C314-pad
  • C314-h85

Package includes:

  • C314 multi pattern studio condenser mic
  • H85 universal shockmount
  • SA60 stand adapter
  • W214 foam windscreen
  • Metal carrying case

Four selectable polar patterns
perfect for every application: vocals, guitars, overheads, piano and more

Lowest self noise
for the highest resolution in high-dynamic applications, such as miking classic instruments

Overload detection LED
indicates overly high sound pressure levels - know exactly when to use the pad

Computer-matched diaphragms
guarantee the highest polar pattern accuracy

Integrated capsule suspension
reduces mechanical noise and resonances

20 dB attenuation pad and bass-cut filter
for close-up recording and reducing the proximity effect